Dinah Shore Best Quotes

Dinah Shore (born Frances Rose Shore; February 29, 1916 – February 24, 1994) was an American singer, actress, television personality, and the top-charting female vocalist of the 1940s. She reached the height of her popularity as a recording artist during the Big Band era of the 1940s and 1950s, but achieved even greater success a decade later, in television, mainly as hostess of a series of variety programs for Chevrolet. Enjoy Dinah Shore’s best quotes below.

Dinah Shore
“Why should unmarried women be discriminated against – unmarried men are not.”
“The best money advice ever given me was from my father. When I was a little girl, he told me, ‘Don’t spend anything unless you have to.’”
“I never wanted to set the world on fire. So I never had to burn any bridges behind me.”
“Trouble is part of your life – if you don’t share it, you don’t give the person who loves you a chance to love you enough.”
“I’m not really a country singer, although I did make a couple albums and love its simple, straight-from-the-heart approach, but I have always sung a lot of jazz, show tunes, pop tunes, gospel and blues.”
“And I’ve never taken up a sport just because it was a social fad.”
“Bing Crosby sings like all people think they sing in the shower.”
“I earn and pay my own way as a great many women do today.”
“In country music the lyric is important and the melodies get a little more complex all the time, and you hear marvelous new singers who are interested in writing and interpreting a lyric and in all form of popular music.”
“When I was four or five, my father had a general store in Winchester and I don’t think the farmers could ever leave on Saturday afternoon until I had been placed up on the counter to sing.”
“I can’t remember a time when I wasn’t singing.”
“My tastes are eclectic.”
“Emmys are wonderful and I’m thrilled to death that I have mine. But they’re representative of a specific achievement, where this sort of thing is representative of how you’ve grown in your own industry.”
“When rock came along the lyrics and melodies became less important and it bothered me to think that perhaps they might not regain the value they have to music – they are music.”

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